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Benjamin F. Butler

Family Life of Benjamin F. Bulter


Young Benjamin F. Butler

Image result for benjamin f butlerIn 1839, Benjamin F. Butler met a man named Fisher Aimes Hildreth. Fisher lived in the next town over from Lowell where Ben lived in Massachusetts. Ben and Fisher connected immediately and developed a life-long relationship. That same year Fisher invited Ben to his family Thanksgiving meal. It was there, Ben, met Fisher’s daughter, Sarah. According to Ben, Sarah was attractive, educated, and intelligent and, she had a passion for acting. In fact, she appeared in plays in New York and Boston. Ben showed a curiosity for a romantic relationship with Sarah but she was not interested in giving up her career to accompany a small town lawyer just starting out (1).

Sarah Butler

Image result for benjamin f butler

As time went on Sarah acquired popularity and stardom for her work. Ben, worked his way into a successful law office, and the two continued to stay in contact with one another. In May of 1844, after a long courtship, they married. Ben brought Sarah to his home in Lowell, and there they lived until she passed away from “an untimely death” in 1877 (2).

Ben and Sarah’s Children

Together Ben and Sarah created a good sized family: a girl named Blanche, and three sons: Paul, who died at age four, Paul II, and Ben-Israel. Ben-Israel decided to follow his father’s footsteps and enter into public service. He was appointed to West Point, graduated with honors and commissioned Lieutenant. Ben, proud of his son’s accomplishments encouraged Ben-Israel to take command and lead a “regiment of colored troops stationed on the Plains [so that] he might have, in addition to his instructions at the academy, the knowledge of the movement and care of the troops in actual service.” The significance of his decision by Ben Butler was that he wanted his son to acquire some military experience working as a volunteer and not someone who earned rank from being nobility (3).

Tragedy

After completing his military service, Ben-Israel planned to join in partnership with his father Benjamin’s law practice. But as Benjamin writes in his memoir, “I had hoped to lean upon him in my declining years, to take my place in that profession which I love and honor. ‘Man proposes. God disposes.'” Ben-Israel’s unexpected sudden death ended any chance of a father- son career dream for both of them. Ben’s daughter married a Civil War General, Adelbert Ames and raised a family while Paul sought a business career upon his graduation from Harvard. Ben, impressed with Paul’s accomplishment at a prestigious university, felt his choice of school would impact Paul favorably later in life if he desired to enter into politics (4).

A Valued Relationship

Throughout Ben Butler’s military and political career, Sarah, his wife, proved to be one of his staunchest supporters. She advised him from time to time. Her intelligence and education were a great asset to Ben. It allowed him to view his world not only from a humanitarian perspective but also that of a woman. Sarah related to Ben on a different level, but she never interfered and trusted Ben’s final judgment. When Ben experienced political strife and controversy, she remained by his side with poise and dignity (5).

Value of Family

Benjamin F. Butler’s credited his success as a lawyer, veteran, and political figure to the strong family support system he created with his wife, Sarah. He also credits his family upbringing as inspiration and passion for a lifetime of civil service to others. We can interpret his decisions and actions in his life through his experiences and thoughts about them.

 

1. Benjamin F. Butler, Butler’s Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major General Benj F. Butler : A Review of His Legal, Political, and Military Career (Boston: A.M. Thayer & Co., 1892),78-79.

2. 79.

3. 80-89.

4. 80-81.

5. 85.

 

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Benjamin F. Butler and His View on Equality


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Benjamin F. Butler, 1870, Wikipedia.org

” There may be able children of degenerate sires. But whether such instances are not proof of the rule depends upon the question, whether, from some earlier intermingling, better blood may have not have been taken from the lower class.”-Benjamin F. Butler

A View on Racial Equality

In continuing with my reading of Benjamin F. Butler’s autobiography, I get a sense that he writes in a way to give insight as to how he views the world around him and how this view influenced his decision making though out his life and career. One thing that stands out is his view on racial equality. He does not agree with the elite intellectual thought theorized during the 19th century that inherited genes of the first born child are the strongest genes, and that subsequent offspring will receive a watered down version. Because of this, parents with mixed races were thought to be incapable of passing down good genes. Butler disagreed with this. He argued that parents of mixed races passed down stronger genes because by banding together the genes mutated more favorably due to populations being in constant state of war and survival in early New England. The information Butler provides in his memoir points to his view that mixing society with different races other than “white” did, in fact, produce individuals capable of acquiring equality. Mainstream society was against this idea throughout Butler’s entire life. To step out of that norm and stand up for what he believed and felt was right and opposite of what society thought was courageous (1).

Military Family

Butler was proud of his military heritage. His grandfather Zephania participated in the Revolutionary war and his father John in the war of 1812. John was commissioned captain of “light dragoons” and served the Northern frontier until he broke his leg. After that, he continued to serve in the war by becoming a privateer. Due to his success at this and his aid to the American cause, he was re-commissioned and sent to New Orleans to work under the direct command of General Jackson. From there he ended up working logistically for ships going back and forth to South America. On one of these voyages, John caught Yellow Fever and died Soon after. The suffering Butler’s father endured bothered Butler so much he vowed to “investigate the scourage” and blamed the viral devastation as a major influence in decisions later in his life (2).

Raised in Religious Household

The way Butler’s writes of his mother shows how much of a close of a relationship they had and how much respect he had for her. His mother was a Calvinist, and he notes this again and again in his book I think this is to show how this religious upbringing shaped his entire life. His mother envisioned him to grow up and become a minister however due to circumstances at the time this was not the best option for him. During Butler’s childhood children went to college at 12 and one of the students he grew up with attended Harvard University.  He was awestruck by this, and it seems Butler also surrounded himself with very smart and intellectual people even at a pre-teen age (3).

School Years

To prepare for religious college Masters would administer a test in which Butler excelled by exceeding the standards of his peers. His high score propelled him to a college prep school where he learned Latin and Greek. To him, language was not an art but merely memorizing, and he used this to strengthen his analytic skills of paragraphs, of which he was good at and made him feel proud. To him, it was a way to use his talents to do something good for people in his public service. During prep school, he attended a Unitarian church because he felt the school’s religious rules conflicted with thier belief in one God vs. his belief in the Trinity (4).

Somehow (he does not explain how) he ends up moving to Lowell Massachusetts. Lowell became a city as a result of a manufacturing boom between 1822 and 1836. There he acquired a part-time job to help with his living expenses. It is not clear if Butler lived alone, with his mother or with a roommate. He enjoyed living in the city (5).

During Butler’s college years he mentions a couple of people whom he finds inspirational. One of these was the Reverand Theodore Edson, rector of ST. Anne’s church and who worked tirelessly to establish the Lowell High School. Butler mused that “When he perceived the right thing to do, he did it, regardless of personal consideration or of danger to himself.” Edson was instrumental in establishing more schools in the town so that future generations of women, children and freemen could obtain an education and therefore be eligible for equal opportunity. Butler considered Edson’s passion and his perseverance to see his vision through against the opposition of ex-English Calvary officer, Kirk Boot who wanted to capitalize financially on grounds owned by the manufacturing companies, very courageous (6).

Serving Humanity

Equality was important to Butler from early in his life. Growing up and being surrounded by friends and family influenced him and his thoughts on poverty, education and equal opportunity for all people not just the White elite or upper class. He was obviously very smart and read books that were hard for him to read. He liked to challenge himself to do better and when he accomplished he yearned for ways to help others with his talents.

1. Benjamin F. Butler, Butler’s Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major General Benj F. Butler : A Review of His Legal, Political, and Military Career (Boston: A.M. Thayer & Co., 1892), 36.

2. Ibid, 41-43.

3. Ibid, 45, 50.

4. Ibid, 51.

5. Ibid, 52.

6. Ibid, 52-54.

 

Benjamin F. Butler: Why All Men are not Created Equal


b-butler-display
Benjamin F. Butler, 1870, Wikipedia.org

“The political system of this country is founded upon what Rufus Choate once termed a “glittering generality,” contained in the Declaration of Independence, that “all men are created equal.” This is a truth as applied to political rights, immunities, and burdens, but an utter absurdity so far as it is made to describe other mutual relations of people.”-Benjamin F. Butler

It is not surprising Benjamin F. Butler begins his autobiography with an opinion of equal rights and how those rights contradict themselves in the line of the Declaration of Independence; “all men are created equal”. Butler’s life and work were all about equality. He articulated well his idea of the definition of equality, and how the United States society’s interpretation differed. The cause of this difference according to Butler is while the definition of equality meant people and their actions were recognized legally, judiciously, it did not apply to the equal rights of individuals. Butler was not alone in his thoughts. Many other folks recognize this problem such as Thaddeus Stevens and Charles Sumner. Butler obsessed about it because of his passion for the law and helping those who were unable to help themselves obtain equality and justice (1).

Butler’s analysis of how the “all men are created equal” caused a problem for equality in the U.S. makes a lot of sense. He uses the horse for an example of this. He explains that a horse is just a horse but when divided into different species each is quite different in its abilities. Therefore, not every horse is created equal. Like all people of the world, each belongs to a different class. Higher class horses are bread differently so that the can achieve results or meet higher expectations. People are born into these separate classes in the same way. By birthright, there is no automatic equality. Therefore basing equality on a false assumption in the Declaration of Independence unintentionally set the United States up for generations of misunderstanding about equality that is still relevant today(2).

Notes:

1. Benjamin F. Butler, Butler’s Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major General Benj F. Butler : A Review of His Legal, Political, and Military Career (Boston: A.M. Thayer & Co., 1892), 33.

2 .Declaration of Independence. http://www.ushistory.org/Declaration/document/

 

 

Benjamin F. Butler: His Use of Profile Portraits


I am embarking upon a new journey into the public and private world of Benjamin F. Butler. This is a series of blog posts that will document some of the histories as I study them. The purpose of my study is better to understand why Butler made decisions that brought much controversy and caused public opposition to his policies throughout his career and life.

b-butler-display
An 1870’s portrait of Benjamin F. Butler, from Wikipedia.

 

Butler’s Professional Portrait

Inside of Benjamin F. Butler’s autobiography, you will see a copy of a portrait of himself. He poses with his side to the camera with a signature that reads, “Compliments of Benjamin F. Butler.” The copy is from an engraving of a painting that Darius Cobb did in 1890. Darius Cobb, of the famous Cobb Brothers, hailed as one of the great American artists of the 19th century. (1) Darius himself also painted portraits of Abraham Lincoln and General U.S. Grant. Perhaps the reason Butler chose Cobb to paint his portrait was on the word of mouth by Lincoln and Grant. The choice by Butler may have been deliberate to add extra authenticity to his image by presenting a proud portrait to the public he so loved in his life. It can also be deliberate because of the controversy surrounding his life and career that often overshadowed his good works and real intentions. With the accompaniment of the portrait in his autobiography, he adds the stamp of approval, making the work official with his photo and signature. (2)

The photograph itself does not stand out much during the late 19th century. Profile portraits are very common during this time, and there are plenty of examples of them in historical archives. The placement and choice of the photographic pose in Butler’s autobiography are significant because it keeps Butler in a neutral position. The portrait represents Butler as a public official, a professional, and a compassionate yet capable leader. It also leaves plenty to the imagination of the observer. It may have been Butler’s ultimate intention to allow individuals to judge his past with one’s own eyes and interpretations, absent from popular folklore biases to glean the truth of who Benjamin F. Butler was. (3)

References used:

1. For background and general interest in Benjamin F. Butler, see: https://www.google.com/#q=benjamin+f.+butler.; Benjamin F. Butler, Butler’s Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major General Benj F. Butler : A Review of His Legal, Political, and Military Career (Boston: A.M. Thayer & Co., 1892).

2. “Darius Cobb.” Wikipedia. December 30, 2014. Accessed January 01, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darius_Cobb.

3. “Photography in Nineteenth-Century America.” The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Accessed January 01, 2015. http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/art-music-and-film/essays/photography-nineteenth-century-america.

Further reading:

“PhotoTree.com Is Dedicated to Research, Restoration, and Preservation Of19th and Early 20th Century Photographs.” 19th Century Photographs. Accessed January 01, 2015. http://www.phototree.com/history.htme.

“Portrait Painting.” Wikipedia. Accessed December 30, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_painting.

Snead, William Thomas. Portraits and Autographs: An Album for the People. London: Mowbray House, 1890.

 

 

 

 

Benjamin F. Butler: Penning the Past to Present to the Future


I am embarking upon a new journey into the public and private world of Benjamin F. Butler. This is a series of blog posts that will document some of the histories as I study them. The purpose of my study is better to understand why Butler made decisions that brought much controversy and caused public opposition to his policies throughout his career and life.
b-butler-display
An 1870’s portrait of Benjamin F. Butler, from Wikipedia.

Benjamin F. Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) completed his personal memoir in 1892 upon retiring from public service to shed light on his legacy for future generations. He led a controversial life and most of it is portrayed in the decisions he made as military commander, politician and distinguished lawyer in one of the most troubling times in the history of the United States. (1)

How can one judge Butler’s decisions when relying only on his record of those decisions without taking a closer look at the man himself? One answer to this is to begin getting to know Butler, himself, through his memoirs. Reading his own words and comparing them to the historical context in which those decisions were made, his background, cultural history, his education and various experiences through the years, can be weighed against his character. This will give an idea as to why he might have made those decisions based on what he felt was the right thing to do at the time.

As this information becomes clearer, one can view a larger picture of the history because decisions Butler made affected the world around him. Still, others may have influenced his thinking and he in turn he may have influenced others. The connection formed from this process of historical study strengthens knowledge of the past because they connect thoughts, actions and words and allow researchers to understand more of why Butler and others made their decisions and the reasons for them. This can lead to more questions or answer questions of just what Butler’s intent was. Was Benjamin F. Butler heartfelt at helping out where he could by using his talents and skills or was he a selfish person using those tools to create a persona of celebrity and personal gain? (2)

Benjamin F. Butler continues to fascinate new generations of historians and enthusiasts. Luckily, at the time, Butler saw his controversies’ as something that would be questioned by those future generations and decided to pen his past to present to the future his side of the story. He did not want his character judged by his decisions’ and actions but by how he came to those decisions and why he felt so strongly about them. His memoir is not only useful to answer some of those questions but allows a place to start looking just where Benjamin F. Butler fits in American history.

1. For background and general interest in Benjamin F. Butler, see: https://www.google.com/#q=benjamin+f.+butler.

2. Benjamin F. Butler, Butler’s Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major General Benj F. Butler : A Review of His Legal, Political, and Military Career (Boston: A.M. Thayer & Co., 1892).

 

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